Sheds a little light on the issues in this ongoing ethical and political controversy.

An earlier attempt at unraveling the Social Security morass.
Contains some interesting facts about China as well as as well as a section on John Keynes fascination with compound interest or growth.

Attempts to shed a little light on this burning issue in the law.

Answers the question of whether Social Security is a bad deal and, if so, for whom?
Answers the question: What sort of gain in benefits will be available in 2037 (after the trust fund expires) and in 2085 (end of the forecast horizon) for today's youth, in constant $2011?
Answers the question: Does Social Security or Medicare most resemble welfare?
Puts the enigma surrounding the Social Security Trust Fund to rest.
Puts the massive difference between historic returns on common stocks and government bonds in a very bright light.
Puts the case for the privatization of Social Security in a negative light.
Puts the case for partial direct-investment of the trust fund in equities in a positive light.
Includes previously unpublished observations by Paul Samuelson on the subject of Social Security and Ponzi schemes as well as Samuelson's belief that the Social Security Trust Fund should have a stake in the equities market.
Explains the so-called magic of compound interest/growth in a succinct and convincing way.
Puts the huge present value of unfunded liabilities for Social Security in perspective.
Puts the half-true analogy between Social Security and Ponzi Schemes to rest.

Examines the question: Why was Juan Williams fired from NPR?

Bill Bennet made an outlandish statement about abortion and the nation's crime rate a couple of years ago that created a tempest in the national press. This article attempts to sort out the controversy.

This article addresses the Miers nomination as well Chief Justice John Roberts preposterous claim that he is merely an umpire calling balls and strikes, as he blithely writes 5/4 decisions that have the same effect as if they were properly authorized amendments to the United States Constitution.

Explores the mystery of life from a would-be philosopher's point of view.
Includes a short poem on the subject.
In need of revision by experts.

Examines the age old debate about nature versus nurture insofar as measures of human accomplishment are concerned.
Challenges the conventional wisdom that IQ/SAT scores are what intelligence, judgment and success depend on.
Puts the focus on good judgment, as distinct from common sense, or a good education as the prince of all human mental abilities.
Contains William Benet's essay, Genius an Overview, which is possibly the most incisive four pages written on this intriguing subject.

This proposal made in 1979 is a little out of date. However, it does show the degree to which the stock market was chronically undervalued at the time setting the stage for a 2,581.3% rise during the ensuing 20 years, 1979-1999.

Discusses how far down the road America has already traveled on the road to socialism while leaving open the question of how much further it is likely to go.

Answers the question of whether Social Security is a bad deal and, if so, for whom?
Answers the question: What sort of gain in benefits will be available in 2037 (after the trust fund expires) and in 2085 (end of the forecast horizon) for today's youth, in constant $2011?
Answers the question: Does Social Security or Medicare most resemble welfare?
Puts the enigma surrounding the Social Security Trust Fund to rest.
Puts the massive difference between historic returns on common stocks and government bonds in a very bright light.
Puts the case for the privatization of Social Security in a negative light.
Puts the case for partial direct-investment of the trust fund in equities in a positive light.
Includes previously unpublished observations by Paul Samuelson on the subject of Social Security and Ponzi schemes as well as Samuelson's belief that the Social Security Trust Fund should have a stake in the equities market.
Explains the so-called magic of compound interest/growth in a succinct and convincing way.
Puts the huge present value of unfunded liabilities for Social Security in perspective.
Puts the half-true analogy between Social Security and Ponzi Schemes to rest.

Examines and explains the reasoning behind Albert Einstein's description of compound interest (or growth) as "the greatest mathematical discovery of all time" according to Burton Malkiel's widely acclaimed book, A Random Walk down Wall Street.

Examines the following issue about IQ as stated in the online encyclopedia Wikipedia: Whether or not IQ tests are an accurate measure of intelligence is open to debate. It is difficult to define exactly what constitutes intelligence; it may be the case that IQ scores represent a very specific type of intelligence.

This article points out that theoritically correct dividend discount models, while theoretically correct are in practice just a pipe dream

Not unless he gets population and/or consumption under control.
My take on the Club of Rome's message.